2016-2017 Events Calendar

September 22-23, 2017: BH and DH: Book History and Digital Humanities

Often celebrated and criticized as the next big thing in humanist research and teaching, “the digital humanities” get a lot of press for shaking up the way things are done. But is “dh” a continuation of some of the most “traditional” scholarly work in the humanities: bibliography, textual criticism, and book history? This conference, convened by the Center for the History of Print and Digital Culture at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, aims to study how digital humanities grows out book history, how “bh” and “dh” continue to be mutually informative and generative, and how they also contradict each other.

Keynote Lecture, Conrad A. Elvehjem Building, Room L160, Friday September 22, 5:30 p.m.:

Post Scripts: Graphologies of Bookmaking After Adobe

Matthew Kirschenbaum, Professor of English at the University of Maryland and author of Mechanisms: New Media and the Forensic Imagination and Track Changes A Literary History of Word Processing.  To register see http://go.wisc.edu/sauqw6

Friday, October 20: Borghesi-Mellon Workshop on Science, Nature, and Wonder in the Middle Ages in collaboration with the Department of English and the Anonymous Fund: workshop (and public lecture (Helen C. White Hall, 6191 at 4:00 p.m.) by Prof. Kellie Robertson (English, University of Maryland College Park).  Details TBA

Friday, October 27: Borghesi-Mellon Workshop on Science, Nature, and Wonder in the Middle Ages

Karl Whittington (Art History, Ohio State University) "Map versus Diagram in Medieval Cartography." workshop and discussion, 12:00 - 1:15, Hagen Room, 150 Conrad A. Elvehjem Building, Department of Art History, 800 University Ave. RSVP to tedale@wisc.edu to request background reading.

In the history of medieval and early modern cartography, what counts as a diagram and what counts as a map? This question may seem purely academic (such categories were probably not part of these works’ conception) but they can be useful and productive in thinking about the aims and goals of the medieval people who created two-dimensional representations of space. A web of scholarship in art history, philosophy, and the history of science has probed the ontological status of medieval diagrams, but distinctions between maps and diagrams remain elusive and contradictory. Is the critical distinction about the level of schematism or abstraction in a representation? Or is it about its subject matter or argument? Is it a difference in degree or a difference in kind? This workshop explores the categories of map and diagram in the middle ages through a series of examples, and participants are encouraged to bring in their own case studies for discussion.

Friday, October 27: Borghesi-Mellon Workshop on Science, Nature, and Wonder in the Middle Ages

Karl Whittington (Art History, Ohio State University): "From Page to Wall: Scientific Form and Diagrammatic Painting in the Age of Giotto." Public Lecture, Department of Art History, Conrad A. Elvehjem Building, L150, 4:00 p.m.  Co-Sponsored by the Department of Art History, and the Center for Visual Cultures.

While most scholars of Italian Gothic painting focus on narrative and devotional works of art, numerous other works were created during the period that would most accurately be described as diagrammatic. These paintings, often esoteric and enigmatic, provided medieval viewers with access to scientific and diagrammatic modes of representation that were more often reserved for manuscripts. Drawing on the extensive recent scholarship about medieval scientific illustrations and diagrams, this lecture explores the intersection of manuscript contexts and monumental painting in fourteenth-century Italy, arguing that certain modes of viewing and communication that were developed primarily in manuscript contexts were harnessed in these much more public works. Exploring the scholastic and scientific backgrounds of such paintings can help move us closer to understanding the ways that Trecento painters conveyed meaning and information in a series of spectacular but little known works.

Friday, November 3, 2017: Borghesi-Mellon Workshop on Science, Nature, and Wonder in the Middle Ages.

Erin Connelly (SIMS Fellow in Digital Manuscript Studies and Librarian for Medieval Studies at the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies,  University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia) "Ancientbiotics, Interdisciplinarity, and the Applications of Medieval Medicine" workshop and discussion, 12:00 - 1:15 p.m., Hagen Room, 150 Conrad A. Elvehjem Building, Department of Art History, 800 University Ave. RSVP to tedale@wisc.edu to request background readings.

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Friday, November 3, 2017: Borghesi-Mellon Workshop on Science, Nature, and Wonder in the Middle Ages.

 Erin Connelly (SIMS Fellow in Digital Manuscript Studies and Librarian for Medieval Studies at the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies,  University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia): "Medieval Medicine for Modern Infections: Could ancientbiotics of the past inspire antibiotics of the future?", public lecture, Department of Art History, Conrad A. Elvehjem Building, L150, 4:00 p.m.
 

Friday, December 8, 2017: Borghesi-Mellon Workshop on Science, Nature, and Wonder in the Middle Ages.

Claudia Swan (Art History, Northwestern University), Workshop and discussion on the topic, "Image, Imagination, Cognition." 12:00-1:15 p.m. in the Hagen Room, Department of Art History, Conrad A. Elvehjem Building, Room 150 (at north entrance towards the University Club).

Friday, December 8, 2017: Borghesi-Mellon Workshop on Science, Nature, and Wonder in the Middle Ages.

Claudia Swan (Art History, Northwestern University), public lecture, "Art, Nature Fabrication," Department of Art History, Conrad A. Elvehjem Building, Room L150, 4:00 p.m.  Co-sponsored by Medieval Studies, the Center for Early Modern Studies, the Center for Visual Cultures, and the Department of Art History.

The often complex, always productive, and sometimes vexed relationship between art and nature is an august topos of early modern European culture—and of artistic production in particular. The relationship between art and nature played out across a variety of arenas in the early modern era. One arena in which the principles and products of art and nature were cultivated is the collection—and in particular, the sorts of collections referred to as Wunderkammern, chambers of wonder. The complex artifacts that epitomize Wunderkammer collections were prized for seeming the products of art and nature alike. This paper focuses on one such artifact, the shell vessel or Nautiluspokal, produced in large numbers around 1600. Fabricated objects that embody the play of art and nature, shell vessels emblematize the relationship between collecting and trade, and the commercialization and collecting of rare, foreign, curious, exotic items—nacre and lucre.